Category Archives: The Agaricus blazeii Murrill Notebook

Agaricus blazeii Murrill, Sacha Inchi Oil and Me (part 2)

the first part of this post is here

To review, from about 1999 to 2002, I was very involved with researching and promoting a medicinal and gourmet mushroom called ABM, Agaricus blazeii Murrill. As part of this, I wrote my first book. I did this in Tokyo, Manhattan and around Toledo, Ohio. I established many relationships and enjoyed being involved with a healthful food item in a positive community, and creating possibilities. However, I entered the world of VR and, after that, returned to the world of books and art. I don’t feel as if there are huge differences between the different areas in my life.

Everything is about human relationships and data/information. Efficiency and planning are the keys and I am always working to improve in these areas, without becoming closed-minded. I've been told that the Japanese word for “busy”(isogashii) means “no heart”. Something like that.

So... Johor Bahru, Malaysia. April 2017. Sacha inchi oil. When you are around people who are really healthy, you notice it immediately. !!!! As a writer I have to be careful here! Sometimes, when one describes one’s interactions and activities that are associated with healthy foods and practices, it is easy to across as purely a salesman, sincere or otherwise. Yes, there is an economic aspect, but it is not the main reason that I am thinking about sacha inchi. Sales can lead to an awareness of the powers within plants and humans.

Sacha inchi reminds me of ABM very much. I am considering getting involved with it because I now have experience in sharing nutraceutical information, and interest in sacha inchi is already starting. It seems that Singapore, Malaysia and China are growing markets. America and Japan have potential.

It would be interesting to come up with some idea that combines art with sacha oil. A year ago, my partner and I performed the Iron Fire Riceball Tour, which combined performance art with food art. Meaning simply, we just marched around to all of the organic food stores in Singapore and asked any of the staff if they would like to try an organic riceball flavored with organic miso with permaculture grown ingredients. It was not a commercial project, it was about communication and connecting;art. We didn’t talk business, though it was clear where the miso and rice came from. We had been living in Bali and had worked on the permaculture farm that produced the miso. That little tour was beautiful.

So now; it is an amusement for me to think of how to connect with saha ishi in a way that is personal. What I have thought of so far:

-a book on sacha inchi, but one that is a collection of short stories about everything from the history of the plant to the growing to the processing to the person who is using sacha inchi as a treatment for a serious diseases.Fact-based fiction with emotion.

-a 360 short film that documents a room full of longtime saha ichi users. The setting would be naturalistic and simple. There would be at least 10 or 12 actors and actresses. These people would not have to do anything, but they would be aware of the fact that they are being filmed. The person who sees the film would, simply, sense and observe the healthy bodies.

-the sacha inchi game. Something interactive, of course.Exciting and based on how scientists think sacha inchi empowers the immune system, it would be cool to make a game something like this:

I will think. Sacha inchi is good stuff!

Agaricus blazeii Murrill, Sacha Inchi Oil and Me

Unexpectedly, I now find myself in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. I have been here for two months, during which time I started to write a book called Touching JB. It is about Johor Bahru, Singapore, food, AR/VR, people, game development, history; many things. It is also self-reflective, but hopefully not in a narcissistic way. My past experiences connect me to the present and future, of course, as they do for everyone.

The most recent example of this involves something called Sacha Inchi Oil. I  was just introduced to it here in JB, and I am very interested in it. First, some background information. The first book I wrote was called the Agaricus blazei Murrill Notebook. It was print-on-demand, but I never marketed it. I believe in that book, but it needs to be revised. Paul Stamets, one of the world’s top mushroom scientists, wrote to me soon after I informed him of the book. He told me two things and then suggested I stop publication.

I don't remember exactly,but first Paul told me something like the taxonomy (the way that scientists classify things) for the "ABM" mushroom had changed. Agaricus blazeii Murrill had become cultivated and improved so much that it was considered to have be a new species called agaricus subrufescens.Or something like that; even now the taxonomy isn't straightforward. That happened weeks before I finished the book, and I was unaware of it. That by itself was not an absolute game changer, as most of people would continue to use the old name or would be aware of both. The other complication was that a test result that I referred to in the book had been found to be inaccurate; falsified.So, despite a great deal of interest, I didn’t get the ABM Notebook in the hands of readers.

At the time of the book’s completion I had moved to Singapore to work for a startup doing 3D gamemaking/VR, which I was thrilled to be doing, but which also took up all of my time.I didn’t revise the book.

Before the move to Singapore, I was working with an amazing woman who was a pharmacist and a mother of two boys. We were both living in Japan at that time, and it was there that she introduced me to the company that grew and produced very high quality ABM. We sold their product on the internet as well as at health fairs in the US.The challenges: we were both new at selling something like ABM, the internet was new to us and our freeze-dried ABM was extremely expensive. We seemed to be pioneers as very few people knew about ABM. In short, we learned a lot, made some great connections and didn’t sell much.

However...there are very few things that can compare to playing a small part in a process that results in a person regaining some, or all, of their health.

However, the partnership, the international network and the lessons learned became dormant. But... a few days ago, I discovered sacha inchi oil.

....................30...................

Part two of this story is here.

re: Paul Stamet; This is his company.

This TED talk by Paul is full of mushroom/cancer facts and hope. Go to 1:20

Book Merah: 10 years without any marketing. Why?


...this post has been prepared as part of the Book Merah Ten Year Anniversary Party... to see other posts related to the history of Book Merah, click here.

"Each author should experiment, but I will say that nothing is better than writing the next book. If any time is being spent marketing in lieu of writing, that’s a bad decision."

Hugh Howie, NY Times bestseller and superstar self-published writer, in an interview with Digital Book World that appeared online April 4, 2016. The interview is here. A few days earlier, the Observer published its own interview with Mr. Howie. Both of these articles are must reads for anyone seriously interested in self-publishing.

I didn't know about Hugh Howie in 2006. Thanks to my father, though, I did know a lot about the book business. My father sold/sells books to school libraries. (I remember him driving his Buick (usually full of boxes of books);  me in the passenger seat reading the best-seller lists that were on the last page of Publishers' Weekly; I imagined them to be as cool and exciting as sports statistics or music top ten charts. In 2006, when I decided that I would launch Book Merah, I also decided to do no marketing until I had eight books under my belt. Why?

  1. Very often, first books are wobbly collections of words on pages, not  clock-stopping reading experiences. There is no shortcut to mastering a craft and an artform. I'm not saying I have mastered writing--not by any means. But after my third or fourth book I started to bleed less  and had more energy to give to the reader.
  2. Technology. There were no targeted ads in 2006. Things were not quite in focus. Now, you can ask Facebook or Google to put an ad for your book in front of your desired ideal reader. To comply with your request, Facebook will ask you about the age of your desired reader, will ask for his or her shoe size and the last place he or she used a public bathroom. Like a drone equipped with facial recognition software and GPS, Facebook or Google will get your ad in front of him or her.
  3. Social media. My latest book is set in Bali. I can check LinkedIn, Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter and other services for groups in or related to Bali. Yes, I must be be respectful, but it is a huge timesaver and mentally reassuring to know that there are groups of people who share one thing in common with my book, even if it is only location. However, awareness of these groups, and a small amount of involvement with them, is not  marketing.
  4. Marketing is a full-time job and there is a learning curve. For example, how much time does it take to understand and utilize keywords? SEO? Metadata? Time is limited: I decided I would rather wrete and postpone learning about how to do successful online marketing.
  5. The amount of resources needed to market and publicize eight books is almost the same as the amount required to market and publicize one book.
  6. One sale leads to another, hopefully. If a reader likes one book, they will likely be interested in my other books, even if the subject and style are different.
  7. Even if the first book became popular as a result of marketing, there would be a lag before the next book was written and produced. That lag would likely dissolve any marketing achievements made by the first book; the second book might have to start from zero.
  8. I also incorrectly thought that Barack Obama, the subject of my first book on Amazon, would attract readers. If xxx million people  look for short stories about the President of the United States, wouldn't a percentage of them, even a very small percentage of them--find Obama Search Words? Nope. If you want a book to sell, you have to do marketing.
  9. Subject matter. If I were writing non-fiction, different story. If, for example, I wrote a guidebook about Tiong Bahru, I would market it heavily. But my work seems to be cross-genre. Travel-literature-history humor. One of the comments for I Ate Tiong Bahru was "like nothing I've read before."
  10. It's a marathon, not a sprint.  I took the long term view, and am now ready to make a little marketing noise. Maybe make up for "lost" time. Hope that I can connect with interested readers.  Finally, I should mention that despite a lack of marketing, I Ate Tiong Bahru has sold almost 2000 copies in Singapore, where that number is considered a "national bestseller". The review here is stunning, and no, I had absolutely no connection with the magazine that wrote it.

Tables of Adventure, Woe and Joy

If you have followed even a small portion of the trail I have created on the internet, you will see that there are a number of detours and half-finished roads. Despite appearances, work is being done on all of them.   With this post I am jotting down notes about food, as an experience and as artwork. The most concrete example of my food/art projects is probably the thumb kway project which was the result of my involvement with the Open House project. Recently I have been rediscovering my past experiences with all types of food, reinterpreting them as algorithm-related data, settings for performance art and also as elements/influences upon my writing. Related: I Ate Tiong Bahru, Furikake, Lina Adams Food/Singaporean Performance Art History, Melvina Tan's  Jiak Muay Eventually I will add photos, links, a structure and more, but for now, the following is what it is... My Mom -A great cook. Christmas, carrot cake on my birthday (lemon glaze). The carrot cake article in Kurashi No Techo. Bill O'Reilly once mentioned my mom's lasagna on national television. My mom cooked for the sisters who lived in the convent near Regina Coeli School. My dad Oyster stew. Turtle soup. Buying Pinconning cheese on the way to up north. Ma Wilson's cured hams. Driving at sunset to the Moose Lodge for an all you can eat fish fry, driving back on very dark country roads, my brother and I in the back seat with very very full stomachs. Catching bluegills, bass and pike, my mom cooking them. My cousin Denny throwing pepper at me, got some in my eye. Gramma Black's pie made from bananas, Grampa Black: Raisin Bran for breakfast. I tried to make a cake once and added a cup of vinegar instead a cup of water. I worked at Pizza Inn. Doug, before he died telling me about one summer weekend we got a pizza to go from King Cole's or something like that. We both remembered the place, but couldn't  remember the name. He used to work at Ponderosa. Bob Hartman, the summer that Elvis Presley died. We caught salmon off the southern coast of Washington State, ate them hours later. I learned what Pinot Chardonnay was. Rochester NY,RIT Cafeteria food and then trying to experience the egg rolls of every Chinese restaurant in the city. Buffalo wings and PacMan. Toronto: Birthday cake, Iggy Pop and leaving Chinese food on the bus; something in oyster sauce. NYC Pizza slices. The Polish restaurant before Faculty Party played. The Ukraine restaurant. Cous cous at Carl's(?), eating with Arleen at the unexpected dinner with the Ecuadorean family that lived above the No Se No. Thanksgiving Party on the Bowery, driving back to Brooklyn in Ben's classic Volvo after Indian food on 5th street: the Brooklyn Bridge with Frank Sinatra playing. The meals cooked in the basement of a flat on the Lower east Side and running out at midnight to get Haagen Daasz,Paella and canolis. The Spanish food artist. Eating and cooking spaghetti with a friend in the last stages of life with AIDS. He had introduced me to Japanese food and the magic of clear soup. Tokyo Revolving sushi counters.The coffee shop in the middle of pine trees and rice fields that sheltered us and our bicycles from a thunderstorm so big and dense it turned the afternoon into night. Selfies taken with flash and film,the ice sculptures they made behind the Hilton in Shinjuku, nearly every meal a visual composition. The feasts of food, sake and good company at Miagawas. The food experiences in Miharu and Fukushima... The cooking culture of Obama, Japan. Tsukiji market with the three star sushi chef, fugu with the 3 star French chef, takoyaki with my daughter and running out to buy her yakimoo when she should have been sleeping... Paris Berlin: the musician taking us to the gas station that became a restaurant. Munich. Frim Price Koelling, talking about art and our time in Seoul at the Olympics and Trio and movies with optimistic themes; the perfection of imperfection. Hong Kong Too much Peking duck, discovering a char siew fan place that impressed even my mainland Chinese friends. The little place near Hollywood Road where I would eat breakfast nearly every day. Brunei... the colorful cosmos of jungle fruits in the market, noodles with Masui-san at the water village Sevilla. Dinner at the El Bulli hacienda; "the best breakfast in the world" Achatz Handmade Pies! Joe and Burmese food, la phet, Peninsula Plaza Bali: La Bruschetta and barbecued baby pig, the variety of vegetarian restaurants and the Warung Java across the street Documentations Tippling Club, Secrets of Sushi by Kazuko and Chihiro Masui      

The revision of the Agaricus blazeii Murill Notebook (gourmet and medicinal mushroom)

This year, I will restart research for a new edition of the Agaricus Blazei Murrill Notebook. ( I do not know why that person is selling those books at that price. If that is a typo, it is a very strange one.) The ABM Notebook was completed in 2002 but right after publication I discovered that some of the reported studies were not reliable. There was also a taxonomic issue, ie agaricus subfrescens and/or agaricus blazei brasiliensis. Rather than take risks , I decided to not promote the book. Once the contract with the POD publisher expired, the book went into limbo. I am looking forward to finally revising this book, this time emphasizing personal stories rather than medical research. The stories will be from growers and those in the industry. Especially important will be interviews with those enjoying ABM as a gourmet mushroom. Finally, of course, there will be stories from those  who have had positive experiences with ABM in regards to wellness, especially cancer. A few months later... A lot of talk with traditional Chinese medicine doctors, but have yet to connect with anyone involved with ABM. Years ago, however, I was very fortunate to listen to Paul Stamets and briefly spoke with him.  Go to the 9 minute mark of this video if you want to see why I am so interested in mushrooms. Here Mr. Stamets is talking about turkeytail  mushroom extract... The future is fungi. Indeed. He also has a plan to help Fukushima with mushrooms. If you are involved with ABM in any way, do feel free to get in touch.