Tour de France: AR for the Win #1: Fatigue Hawks

A slightly futuristic, highly realistic series of posts…


Arbicle- a piece of bicycling equipment utilizing AR, augmented reality.
I created the word above. In this post, a number of possible ideas and technologies are mentioned. Some may already be in use. However, now, there are no pieces of equipment designed specifically for the uses I mention. So, I have created the word “arbicle”, a combination of AR and bicycle. A small word and easy to "handle", it resembles the word ‘article’: arbicle.

What I am imagining are devices (arbicles) built specifically for the purpose of displaying or generating digital information related to bicycling. (This series of posts focuses upon racing.)

Note: I am not a medical specialist of any sort, and the following are not to be taken as anything more than theoretical exercises.

AR for the win #1: Fatigue Hawks

In this theoretical situation, we assume the following:

  • There are extensive performance, muscle fiber and blood analysis records for all racers. Data related to performance on similar roads and inclines is especially valuable.
  • Blood, saliva, and possibly urine tests can be quickly and periodically be conducted on racers for such things as: myoglobin levels, lactate clearance rate and other biochemical markers related to fatigue.
  • The above information can be combined with live feeds of: the peloton, wind and weather information, road gradient information.
  • Two way communication exists between the fatigue hawk and team members.

The fatigue hawk analyzes all of the data that is presented. Customized algorithms are used.

Communicating with voice, symbols and messages, the fatigue hawk offers suggestions on how to maximize strengths and minimize weaknesses of the team itself. Equally important, the fatigue hawk identifies opportunities, and weaknesses of opposing teams.

Data may reveal the leading team's difficulty with hills for example. By monitoring his/her own team's performance, the wind conditions and the gradient of an upcoming hill, the fatigue hawk can strategize and communicate so that advancement upon the leader can be made.

There are many uncontrollable factors in the Tour de France, but a strong collection of live data is information; and information is power. In the case of the Tour de France, the power is that of an athlete who cannot afford to waste a single kilojoule.

Studying the 1989 Tour de France, much can be learned about efficiency and power; the difference between first place and second was eight seconds.

The rider's arbicles would include a GPS tracking device and a visor capable of displaying the fatigue hawk's symbols and messages. Rearview and frontview cameras are also possibilities.

The fatigue hawk would need an arbicle capable of processing all incoming live data, storing records and communicating audio/visual data to the team members, individually and as a whole.

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I am a writer, researcher, AR producer and artist. No one is sponsoring this; I am now preparing a book on AR and Bicycle Safety. My other books are here.

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For further information:

https://www.dimensiondata.com/believe-in-greatness/tour-de-france

What is Fatigue? New Yorker article by Alex Hutchison

The Science of Running: How to Find Your Limit and Train to Maximize Your Performance by Steve Magness

Old West End Festival Parade (part 1)

Photographs by Stephen Black of the 2019 Old West End Parade.

A collaboration between the sculptor Jack Wilson and Stephen Black can be found here. The project is an augmented reality artwork.

419ness is a collection of blog posts of photographs of Toledo.

abstract mobile artwork
Lake Erie Water Safety
large white house on a green lawn

Part 2 is here!
Stephen Black does a lot of things. His books are here.

Memorial Day Weekend

Old West End

Hello to all.

The following image, when viewed with the free Artivive app, reveals "another dimension", a collaboration with the sculptor Jack Wilson.

The title: Falling Leaves in Spring.

Are you a resident of the Old West End?

Question: would you support a book about the Old West Side?

As you know, the Old West Side is a historical community full of distinctive architecture. Well... I have written a bestselling book about another historical community full of distinctive architecture.

That book is entitled i ate tiong bahru. It is one of my eight books. You can learn more about those books, and i ate tiong bahru, here. I should also mention Bus Stopping, a book of photographs.

Those books were written and self-published, mainly while I was living in Bali. To write about the Old West End would require time, and that means money. Do you think there could enough support for crowdfunding or other forms of support?

Also, any ideas on unusual exhibition spaces? I have a series of prints combine photography with text, and would like to present them to the public.

Thank you for your time and suggestions.

This is a collection of posts about Toledo: 419ness.

Happy to talk to anyone about video, photography, writing and AR.

onwARd,

Stephen Black

about me

A Victorian house in Toledo's Old West End

419ness

A collection of blog posts about Toledo, Ohio

The Maumee River

About Stephen Black

Stephen Black's books

Bicycle, Art and AR experience

This is a simple demo of Augmented Reality.

To do this, two things are needed.

  1. A free download of the Artivive app. This should go on a mobile phone or tablet. Either Android or iOs will work.
  2. A copy of the 2019 Ohio Bicycle Events calendar. If you do not have a printed copy, you can get the same effect by pointing your phone or tablet at this image, featuring "Tour Legs", an artwork by Sassan Filsoof.

To see the AR in action, simply point your phone at the image above or the cover of the printed Ohio Bicycle Events Calendar.

Please note: This project was self-initiated and NOT endorsed by the Ohio Bicycle Event Calendar nor the Ohio Bicycle Federation.

The Ohio Bicycle Events Calendar can be found here.

Thanks to David Black, the rider.

Information on my presentation at the Great Ohio Bike adventure can be found here.

If you are interested in how AR can improve bike safety, click here.

My books can be found here.

Lenovo ThinkReality A6 headset: an inspiration for bicycle safety?

Lenovo ThinkReality A6 headset: an inspiration for bicycle safety?

I am independent; Lenovo is not sponsoring this; the following is simply a way for me to introduce AR to people. I am now working on a book about the impact AR is having on the world of bicycling, especially safety. I am not crowdfunding the book. An early version is now on Amazon. If you would like to support this project, it would be much appreciated.

A list of all of teh AR+bike posts on this blog can be found here.

The Lenovo ThinkReality A6, is a state of the art head mounted device, designed for industrial and medical uses. By looking at its features, we can gain insights into how to use AR to improve bicycling, especially safety.

The A6 was announced by Lenovo in the middle of May, 2019.

The A6 is NOT designed for bicycling. Battery power is an obvious example of why the A6 is not likely to be used on the road. The A6 is claimed to have four hours of power. Bike trips longer than four hours would require consideration for recharging and/or batteries (and their weight). The A6 is not even being offered to individual consumers; it is a B2B product.

An excellent overview of all of the features of the A6 is here.

The A6 features worth discussing are:

RESOLUTION

This refers to the quality of the image. The A6 provides 1080 lines of resolution, which is very good, like a high definition television. A discussion of image quality must include the brightness of outdoor scenes. You cannot see any kind of information if it is lost in the brightness of the sun.

VOICE RECOGNITION

The advantage of voice control is obvious. Just say "Display an alternative route" and see the suggestion appear on your visor (or smart glasses). Safer and faster than pushing buttons, or even stopping to look at a phone or other device. The audio requirements that are unique to bicycling need to be considered.

OBJECT RECOGNITION

The A6 can be "trained" to recognize specific components used in industrial or medical applications. For example, a connecting rod, or a femur. With bicycling, the ability to detect cars, pedestrians and other bicycles is advantageous, especially when combined with tracking. Imagine knowing that an 18 wheeler, traveling 80 miles an hour is 100 yards behind you- without having to turn your head or use your mirror.

Parents could be aware of where their children are. Bike team members can monitor their teammates and competitors.

HEAD GAZE TRACKING

This allows the digital information you are looking at to be properly positioned in your viewing area no matter where you are looking.

GESTURE CONTROLS and THREE DEGREES OF FREEDOM HAND CONTROLLER

These two functions may have no importance while riding, but once off the bike, the ability to control functions and displays by hand could be important for maintenance and repair.

BARCODE READER

At races and tournaments, barcodes could enable quickly changing information to be shared easily. A barcode could be designated for weather updates for example. A rider looking at that barcode would immediately know what to expect, as the weather information is automatically displayed in his or her viewing area.

A6

CAMERAS

The A6 has two fisheye cameras on the front. For bicyclist, one camera on the back is hugely advantageous, as the need to see what is behind is a primary concern.

LIGHT

The A6 has a light. Probably not powerful enough for bicycling, but worth thinking about. Like all things related to bicycles, weight and comfort are issues, as well as price, of course.

These are just some of the ways bike enjoyment and safety can be increased. When we add GPS and impact sensors, we create the opportunity for first responders to immediately know the location of the incident. Two way communication via cameras and voice allow for decisions and preparations to be made in the shortest time possible.

One last point: AR is just starting, which increases the chances of bicyclists having their needs met. If individuals, bike organizations and traffic regulatory agencies and bike equipment manufacturers start communicating now, the shorter the path towards increased AR-enhanced safety will be.

I welcome any questions or comments. Feel free to post below.

PS. I don't want to confuse things, but if you want to see how information might be displayed in visors or smart glasses, take a look at indoor bicycle training. The Rouvy system is full of examples. Look here. (Rouvy is not paying me!)

PSS This blog post is full of examples of AR+bicycling.

Book on Augmented Reality and Safety, the introduction

I will be giving a presentation at the Great Ohio Bike Adventure in June.(Scroll down halfway.)

FWIW, when the Oculus was released, I wrote this blog post about it.

Augmented Reality and Bicycle Safety ebook, introductory notes

Here is a collection of videos and links about AR/Bike applications.

Following is the brief introduction to a collection of notes, links and thoughts related to AR/bike safety.

AR’s future is very bright but, presently, it is barely known by the general public. This is surprising, as AR is the most magical part of Pokemon Go, an app that has been downloaded over a billion times, and earned over $200 million its first month. AR is also widely used in military, scientific and industrial applications. Boeing, for example, has been using AR for jet engine maintenance since the late 1980s. With AR, Ikea revolutionized shopping for furniture. Facebook and Apple are both producing smart glasses specifically for AR. But my opinion, based on my own research, and many discussions with AR professionals in Asia, at MIT, at SXSW, and online, is that AR is not yet widely known. AR is not yet like TV.

My own experiences with AR began in 2003, when I was a creative director with a 3D gamemaking company in Singapore. In 2016, with Sayuri Okayama, I began to act upon ideas for a startup that aims to be the “Pixar of AR”. Our first character, Bubiko Foodtour, will soon have her own AR app.

Discovering the existing, and future, AR/cycling app possibilities is exciting and important to me. My own experiences may allow me to see parts of the AR/bicycling picture that others may possibly not.

An important part of this ebook is to clarify, and raise questions about, the technical interactions between autonomous vehicles, human controlled vehicles, traffic controllers, GPS and bike/AR apps. A woman pushing a bicycle was the first fatality involving an autonomous vehicle: what have we learned from this tragedy?

Bicyclists gather for a memorial service

This is an ebook; it can be easily updated. The interactions between AR and bicycling will only increase, and this project will be updated. If you would like a free copy of the latest edition, send an email to the address below.

Finally, I should say that the AR apps shown within are not paid endorsements. If, in the future, sponsorship occurs, it will be made very clear. If a product appears within these pages, it is because it seems to be a good example.

I welcome your comments, critiques, suggestions and questions.

OnwARd,

Stephen Black

ar2wheels at gmail dottcom

Shadows of Mobiles

Jackwilsonsculpture.com

Bob Seger Book Notes

In the summer of 1976, Michigan had a soundtrack: Live Bullet, by Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band. 

I'm writing. About that. And more.

Daniel Edward Rosen article about Night Moves in Esquire

Night Moves by Stephanie Barber

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvbqGubZmgo