Tag Archives: movies

VIEW 2019 part 4

The Hugo Guerra of Hugo's Desk. Hugo is an extremely good compositor and teacher.

From my TV and gamemaking days, I have some familiarity with compositing. Although it is almost certain that I will never become a compositor, I sat in on Hugo's seminar. I think I retained about .001% of the technical information that Hugo shared, but observing his workflow and troubleshooting tips was inspiring.

The Addams Family: Reintroducing a Classic: the presenters, co-director Conrad Vernon and Producer Alexa Schwartz, spoke about the challenges in creating a new version of The Addams Family. Although the story is contemporary, the two looked at the original drawings of Charles Addams. His drawings, featured in The New Yorker magazine, were the basis of the original TV show.

Conrad and Alexa presented like the professionals that they are. They completed each other's sentences. They kept the topics moving. Perhaps they rehearsed and planned for a long time, or maybe they just improvised so informatively because they knew their subject so well. They showed clips and explained the stories behind them. If there is an Addams Family Hall of Fame, Conrad and Alexa should be in it.

Animated movies have their own unique characteristics, but they also act as "containers" for other art forms, music being the most obvious example, drawing being another. However, successful animated characters are the result of combining drawing, sculpture, programming and... dreaming. Animated characters are often realistic, but they can ignore the laws of physics. Dreams and animation need no logic.

Having said that, the more a VFX operator/CG artist/animator studies reality, the better. Noticing the almost imperceptible muscles movements of the human body results in all kinds of possibilities, especially when one must make a character react to something unexpected. The following clip was shown by Theodore Tye, as part of his excellent presentation entitled Beyond Eye Darts: A Closer Look at Acting for Animation:

This masterclass, through the analysis of clips from animated and live- action films as well as acting theory, takes a fun, in-depth look at the study and execution of both comedy and dramatic acting for animation.

Following is one of the clips shown to exemplify a reaction worth studying.

VIEW took place in OGR Turino, an arts center in what was once a train station.
Glen McIntosh is a paleo-artist, and the supervising artist for Jurassic World.Glen's first film was Star Wars: Episode 1: The Phantom Menace. It was a pleasure to watch him work and share his stories.
Turin is a delight!
Bubiko photobombing animation bigwigs.
Hal Hickel, a legend at Industrial Light and Magic.Winner of both an Academy Award and BAFTA. He has worked on Star Wars, Jurassic Park, AI, Pirates of the Caribbean, Toy Story and The California Raisins!
Closing party. The London Siggraph people put copies of interesting black and white images on the tables, making Offtopic a bit like their Drink and Draw nights in London.

I have just settled down after travelling for over two months. I am still processing all that I learned and experienced at VIEW and an other post is on its way.

Bubiko in Lawnspace screen test

Bubiko's guide to AR is now available on Amazon!

Bubiko: what is a stage?

The goal is to prepare for the possibilities of AR cinema.

This post documents a simple test. The Bubiko model used for the Tech in the Tenderloin event was used. Two locations: a garage and an open piece of land. The objective: to gain an understanding of what a “stage” can be in AR. AR is a new medium; to use the established techniques of theatre, television and movie is to fail to grasp the uniqueness of AR. Performance art and dance provide clues.

Notes: Spark used

  • Occlusion not a concern at this time
  • Ambient light a constant
  • Size and scaling of Bubiko purposely varied

Bubiko was created by Stephen Black and Sayuri Okayama

  • iPad used; no manual controls nor color correction
This is Bubiko Foodtour, still with the balloons and banner she used for her debut in San Francisco, at Tech in the Tenderloin’s 2019 TNT Tech Fest,  Bubiko is a work in progress, this is not her final version.
Bubiko is a 3D model made by Novaby, based on ideas by Stephen Black and Sayuri Okayama.
These images are a screen test of sorts, a way of documenting the possibilities and challenges of AR cinematography.
AR cinematography is one of my AR goals, especially making content for autonomous vehicles.
In these images. Bubiko was positioned near the white log. Only the camera (an iPad) moved. The software used was Spark. It was stable, except when used at long distances, in which case Bubiko appeared some distance away from the post.
The camera automatically controlled exposure. The light was even, the time being late afternoon/early twilight.
Occlusion was not important in this test, but I would love to use a software like 6D for testing.
Again, Bubiko did not move, but her size was changed in camera. AR cinema reminds me of machinima. There is another test of Bubiko HERE.
The format of the screen size is both an opportunity and a challenge.
Bubiko Foodtour models for some AR camera tests.
Interesting that the same model can have the size of a mouse, or a giant, or anything in between. Size in AR was the topic of this blog post. Thanks again to Fabian Winkler.
Bubiko is actually closer to the stump than this image suggests.
Sparks had some difficulty as I moved away from Bubiko's position. For this experiment it was simply an interesting development. If this were actually part of an movie shoot, I would reposition her, or do testing. It should be noted that wifi was not needed to create these images.